Advising & Advice Seeking

One of the relationship builders we talk about in the Certified Networker Program is ADVISING and ADVICE SEEKING!

The 11th Commandment of Networking a Mixer

There are 10 Commandments of Networking a Mixer, as created by Dr. Ivan Misner… and I hope you have enjoyed the previous posts with those commandments.

I feel there is a 11th Commandment of Networking a Mixer:

Commandment #11: Tag Team Networking

When networking a mixer, attending with a partner can be powerful. During the networking event, you and your partner meet people together. When asked what you do, your network partner responds on your behalf. When someone asks what your partner does, you respond. By having your partner share what you do, it enhances your credibility.  Continue reading

10 Commandments of Networking a Mixer: Commandment #10 – Follow Up with the People You Meet

Follow-Up1You can follow the previous nine commandments religiously, however if you fail to follow up, you are wasting your time!

When there is support that you have offered that requires follow up, do it immediately! Even if you do not offer to follow up, get in contact with the people quickly, as it will show your professionalism and build your credibility. (Follow up does not include adding them to your email newsletter distribution list, unless it was requested.)

What is the best way to follow up? There are three different ways to answer that question: Continue reading

Commandment #9: Write Comments on the Backs of Business Cards You Collect

During a networking event, you have the opportunity to meet a number of new people, and unless you have an eidetic memory, you may have trouble remembering every little detail. By writing notes on the back of business cards, you can ensure that the pertinent information you want to remember are captured in writing. This could include when and where you met them, distinct attributes (very tall or British accent), an ideal referral, offering support & follow up activities you want to make certain happen, etc. Continue reading

10 Commandments of Networking a Mixer: Commandment #8: Spend 10 Minutes or Less with Each Person You Meet and Avoid Lingering with Friends and Associates

We are wrapping down our series of the 10 Commandments of Networking a Mixer, today with Commandment #8: Spend 10 Minutes or Less with Each Person You Meet and Avoid Lingering with Friends and Associates. (If you missed our previous commandments, start by checking out the last commandment, #7)

10-minute-timer1Too often when networking, people have a tendency to meet a potential client or referral source, and then spend the rest of their time speaking to a single person. Remember, the goal of attending a networking event is to book a meeting from the meeting, reaching the goals you set for yourself in Commandment #2: Set a Goal for the Number and Type of People You Want to Meet.

As you met people who interest you, who have the potential to be a client or referral source, immediately book the next meeting, then move on to meeting additional people, until you have reached your goal.

While networking, don’t try to close business deals; it is impractical and Continue reading

10 Commandments of Networking a Mixer: Avoid In Person Spamming

Last week we explored the 7th Commandment of Networking a Mixer, exchange business cards with people you meet. Sometimes people take giving their business cards away to the extreme, being guilty of in person spamming… which you want to avoid!

Do you know people who are guilty of IN PERSON SPAMMING?

10 Commandments of Networking a Mixer: Commandment #7: Exchange Business Cards with the People you Meet

Welcome back to our series on the 10 Commandments of Networking a Mixer. If you missed the 1st posts in the series, please visit the past 6 posts

download (1)The purpose of exchanging business cards with people that you meet is so you are able to follow up with them after the networking event, hopefully to continue to build the relationship. For that reason, I recommend that you only exchange business cards with the people you meet that you want to follow up with. Take a quick moment to ensure the contact information you need is on the card when you receive the card.

Hold on to your business cards until the person you are speaking with actually asks you for a card. If she has not asked you for a card yet, Continue reading

10 Commandments of Networking A Mixer: Commandment #6: Offer Support Whenever Possible

Over the past 5 weeks, we have reviewed the 1st of the 10 Commandments of Networking a Mixer – if you have missed them, please review. Now on to Commandment #6… Microsoft-Vista-SupportWhen first meeting a new person, you have the opportunity to be memorable by offering support. What kind of support? Be creative in how you will assist the person; by supporting them in their success, you will be able to quickly build your credibility. Continue reading

Commandment #5: Listen and Ask “5 W” Questions

downloadDale Carnegie shared, showing a genuine interest in the person you are speaking to can help forge the relationship. By taking an interest in the person, you will gain information, which can be powerful in moving the relationship forward. These details can be helpful in determining if you want to schedule an additional meeting with them.

In conjunction with this commandment, there is a technique referred to as “mirroring” that you may want to employ. Continue reading

Commandment #4: Describe your Product & Service

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You have a limited time to make that first impression, so you will want to make sure every second counts!

When networking, business professionals tend to introduce themselves from a FEATURE perspective, often leading with our profession, oftentimes sharing the profession. When we lead with the profession, then people have a tendency to assume they know about us and what we do based off their previous understanding of people who work in your profession.

networkingInstead of introducing yourself by your profession, share with the people you meet how you help others, the why you do what you do.
By starting the conversation with how you help others, you are sharing what you do, and hopefully this will stimulate the person you are meeting to ask HOW you do what you do, and then you can share more about your business.
If people do not ask “How do you do that?” when you share what you do, it means she is not interested at the current time in learning more about how you help people.

If you missed the 1st 3 posts in the series, please visit our previous posts on the 10 Commandments of Networking a Mixer.